August in the flower garden

August in the flower garden can be a bit of a challenge. Summer is well under way and many herbaceous plants have reached their optimum flowering peak. You could be forgive for More »

Vegetable Garden During August

Vegetable Garden During August – August and the summer is in full swing. By now you should be harvesting many of the fruit and vegetables you have worked hard to grow throughout More »

Colors In Your Garden

Colors In Your Garden – The handling of flower and foliage color in the garden usually causes gardeners the most difficulty, but it also entails the most fun. We all agree that More »

Decorative Containers: Sink Garden

Stone sinks are difficult to find, and they are expensive to buy when you track one down, but the old porcelain models are more readily available at not such extortionate prices. It More »

Flower Garden During June

Flower Garden During June – June in the garden and the season is in full swing. Even in the smallest garden there is plenty to do at this time of year. From More »

 

August in the flower garden

August in the flower garden

August in the flower garden can be a bit of a challenge. Summer is well under way and many herbaceous plants have reached their optimum flowering peak. You could be forgive for thinking that this month is a month of tidying up. However, with a bit of forward planning and some gentle encouragement you can design a planting scheme that will ensure that you have plants that flower well into the fall as well as encouraging those earlier flowering ones to produce second flushes. So in-between relaxing and enjoying summer in your garden, take a moment to check this short reminder of things you should be doing in the flower garden during August.

Vegetable Garden During August

Vegetable Garden During August

Vegetable Garden During August – August and the summer is in full swing. By now you should be harvesting many of the fruit and vegetables you have worked hard to grow throughout the season and enjoying the unique taste of fresh salad crops, potatoes, tomatoes, peas and beans homegrown. However, in-between enjoying the fruits of your labor there is still plenty to be doing in even the smallest vegetable garden. So take a minute to read through this short reminder of some of the vital jobs to be doing in the vegetable garden during August.

Bend over the tops of onions as they ripen and sow other varieties of onions which will mature from late June or July next year. Order garlic bulbs ready to plant out in the fall. Make other preparations for late and next season by sowing spring lettuce, winter spinach, spring cabbages and late carrots.

Black-Eyed Susan

Black-Eyed Susan

Black-eyed Susan belongs in every sunny garden. Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) is one of the most common of all wildflowers. It has from 10 to 20 orange-yellow neutral rays around a conical, dark purplish-brown disk of florets containing both stamens and pistil. A Swedish naturalist, Linnaeus, named the species Rudbeckia after Olav Rudbeck and his son, who were both professors, and hirta in Latin is “rough hairy”.

The Black-eyed Susan has also been called many other names, such as Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Daisy, Brown Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy, Poorland Daisy, Brown Betty, Blackiehead, Golden Jerusalem and Brown-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia triloba). They grow in open sunny places, dry fields, along roadsides and just about any type of soil.

Colors In Your Garden

Colors In Your Garden

Colors In Your Garden – The handling of flower and foliage color in the garden usually causes gardeners the most difficulty, but it also entails the most fun. We all agree that some colors ‘go’ better together than others – though we may disagree which – and that in ‘going together’ these colors enhance each other. Good combinations are what we strive for, and that can involve both harmonies and contrasts.

When deciding how to plan a color scheme, it can be helpful to refer to the chart called the ‘color wheel’, which is based on the spectrum. On this circular diagram, the primary colors (red, blue and yellow) are separated from each other by related secondary colors (violet, green and orange).