Category Archives: Fruits

Training Fruit Trees

Training Fruit Trees

Training fruit trees – Cordons are single stemmed trees, fruiting spurs grow directly from the main stem – although double or even triple cordons can be created. Apple and pear cordons are generally planted at an angle of 45° and trained to a height of 1.8 m (6 ft). This produces a stem 2.4 m (8 ft) long. All cordons should be pruned in the summer; little winter pruning is necessary.

Pruning is simple. Cut back all laterals (side branches) to three buds beyond the basal cluster (the cluster of leaves nearest the main stem). Tie in the leader but do not prune it until it has reached 1.8 m in height. Mature cordons may need some of the fruiting spurs thinned in the course of time.

Orange Tree Care

Orange Tree Care

Orange trees are beautiful, and for this reason, they are often featured in advertising as the fauna of exotic, tropical areas. What many people don’t know, however, is that orange trees can be grown in your own backyard, provided you have a somewhat moderate climate and are prepared to take care of them. Read this article to find out all about this citrus tree, and how to care for your own.

The orange tree was first found in Southern China and North India. Because Europeans in the 1500’s valued the fruit for its medicinal qualities, it was imported by Portuguese traders into around the sixteenth century. By the 17th century, small greenhouses were being built in Europe to cultivate orange trees, which by then were known for their sweet taste.

Blueberries In Your Home Garden

Blueberries In Your Home Garden

Blueberries In Your Home Garden – Blueberries add a nice flavor to almost everything. They are a good texture and very sweet. If you are a home vegetable gardener and a fan of blueberries, then you really should consider adding a bush or two. The species have different growth habits: blueberries form a substantial bush, while the two related species are creeping shrubs, sometimes used as ground-cover plants. Established high-bush blueberries should be pruned in winter, removing some old branches to ground level and all side branches growing in a sideways or downwards direction.

Before you get started growing blueberries you must understand that you will need to put a couple of seasons in before you can reap the benefits of a bountiful blueberry harvest.

Growing Cantaloupe

Growing Cantaloupe

Growing cantaloupe – Cantaloupe is a delicious and nutritious gardening crop. There are so many variations that sometimes it is sometimes difficult to choose which to grow. The the flesh of the cantaloupe fruit can have an orange or deep yellow color. The juicy, delicious flavor of this summer crop makes it a preference of many gardeners. As a breakfast food, dessert or as a part of a salad, cantaloupe have found a place in many gardens and on the tables of many kitchens.

Cantaloupe is available in many varieties. If you want to start harvesting in as little as 65 days, plant the Alaska Hybrid. Another fine choice is the Honey Rock which, as its name implies, has a sweet delicious flavor that will remind you of honey.

Growing Peaches And Nectarine

Growing Peaches And Nectarine

Peaches (Prunus persica) and nectarines (P. persica) are ideal for small garden spaces. Firstly because they are self-fertile, meaning they don’t require another tree for pollination. Secondly, there are compact forms of peaches that can successfully be grown in pots, making them suitable for a sunny patio, courtyard or balcony. These varieties rarely growing higher than 1m when grown in a pot, and require minimal pruning.

Peaches and nectarines are best grown as a fan on a warm south or south facing wall. Peaches can be grown as free-standing bushes in very favorable sites, but nectarines will struggle. Due to their slightly tender nature, both peaches and nectarines can also successfully be grown in glasshouses but will require diligent watering. Avoid a heated greenhouse as they require a period of dormancy.

Growing A Pear Tree From Seed

Growing A Pear Tree From Seed

Pear trees (Pyrus communis) bear sweet fruit with crisp, white flesh. Many gardeners tend to shy away from growing fruit trees due to their delicate and temperamental nature. Growing pear trees from seed will take patience and careful planning. Prepare to spend at least a few months just readying the pear seeds for germination before planting. If you take good care of your seedlings, you can grow pear trees from seed that will bear large bounties of fruit year after year.

Cut open healthy, ripe pears with a sharp knife. Scoop the seeds out of the pear with a spoon and place them in a small bowl. Add warm water to the bowl and rinse the fruit pulp off the pear seeds. Lay the seeds onto paper towels to dry.