Category Archives: Outdoor

Dianthus

Dianthus

Dianthus (Sweet William, Carnation) – Dianthus plants are popular with gardeners and have been grown for centuries. A cottage garden is not complete without several dianthus. All are heat tolerant and low maintenance beauties. Dianthus have become popular garden plants, but are also well suited as balcony or patio pot plants.

You may occasionally find pots of dianthus for sale in the house plant section of a garden center. You will not, however, find them in most textbooks – pinks and annual carnations are not accepted as house plants. They do need cool conditions and are not always long-lasting, but they are easily raised from seed and the white, pink or red frilly-edged blooms are attractive. Give them a well-lit spot and do not let the compost dry out. Provide fresh air on hot days.

Array Of Evergreens

Array Of Evergreens

Array Of Evergreens – A surprisingly wide selection of evergreen plants have interestingly shaped or attractively colored foliage, which makes them useful for year-round container plantings, and winter arrangements in particular.

Extremely harsh winters can be a problem for plants in containers, but a small selection can withstand the icy, winter onslaught. Those with interesting foliage include abelia, cotoneaster, Cornish heath, euonymus, holly, calico bush, privet, box, ivy, lavender, pieris, periwinkle, and many conifers: false cypress, juniper, spruce, pine, yew, and Eastern hemlock, to name just a few possibilities.

Foliage Color

Foliage Color

Foliage Color – In general people think of leaves as being green, but look again. Leaves can be all the colors of the rainbow. In itself, green is paramount in the garden. It is the color  that induces calm and tranquillity. It has the ability to  heighten pale colors and to tone down bright ones, and a  pleasant garden can he created with no other color but green. Gardens created entirely with foliage do have a  particular quality of unity and peace but they need not be only green.

Planting Against Walls And Fences

Planting Against Walls And Fences

Planting Against Walls And Fences – When space on the ground is at a premium, you can grow plants on or up, walls and fences. If the planting is above ground, the container must be firmly fixed in position, so that there is no possibility of it falling.

Secure boxes on to window sills with a metal bracket or a strong wire restraint. Frequently check that the brackets and fittings remain both strong and secure.

Black-Eyed Susan

Black-Eyed Susan

Black-eyed Susan belongs in every sunny garden. Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) is one of the most common of all wildflowers. It has from 10 to 20 orange-yellow neutral rays around a conical, dark purplish-brown disk of florets containing both stamens and pistil. A Swedish naturalist, Linnaeus, named the species Rudbeckia after Olav Rudbeck and his son, who were both professors, and hirta in Latin is “rough hairy”.

The Black-eyed Susan has also been called many other names, such as Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Daisy, Brown Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy, Poorland Daisy, Brown Betty, Blackiehead, Golden Jerusalem and Brown-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia triloba). They grow in open sunny places, dry fields, along roadsides and just about any type of soil.

Create A Barrel Of Petunias

Create A Barrel Of Petunias

Create A Barrel Of Petunias – Most petunias are half-hardy perennials but they are best grown as annuals, as the plants tend to become leggy and less floriferous in their second year. In their first year, they flower continuously from early summer until fall, but as with most plants that flower for a very long season, it is important to deadhead spent blooms to keep the display going.

Their leaves and stems are covered with downy hairs and the leaves are also quite sticky, so grow them away from heavy pollution or they will gradually become smothered in black dust.