Roses

Choose Specific Types Of Roses For Your Garden

Choose Specific Types Of Roses For Your Garden

Before you shop for roses for your new rose garden, you should know which types of roses there are.

If you love the way roses look climbing over an arbor, then you may want to take a close look at climbing roses. While most people call any rose that shoots up fast a climbing rose, some of these roses are actually sprawling roses. However, they all basically are roses with vigorously growing canes, small flowers that bloom profusely during the rose’s blooming season, and rather wicked thorns. As climbing roses become well established, some gardeners replace their pruning shears with a tree saw to hack these plants down to a manageable size. These roses are usually quite disease resistant.

Rose Gardening In Early Spring

Rose Gardening In Early Spring

When should you start preparing your rose garden for the onset of spring and summer? Well, if you live in an area where you can start seeing the promise of spring in late March or early April, then you’re an “early spring” rose gardener. However, if you live where March and April still brings icy rain and snow, then just keep waiting out old man winter until your turn at spring arrives and then follow the tips in this article.

Early spring is a time of great activity in the rose garden as you prepare for the beautiful buds that will be sprouting almost any day. Here’s a summary of what needs to be done in order to prepare your roses for the tough growing season that lies ahead.

Roses In Late Fall

Roses In Late Fall

Gardeners in colder climates must prepare their roses for the winter. The best time to make these preparations is late autumn.
Frost, wind, snow and freezing days aren’t enough to stop this blooming beauty, so if you’re putting your garden to bed, wait to tuck your roses in until nights in your area are consistently 26 degrees F. Until then, they’ll continue to bloom even though the weather has us shivering. The growing season has come to an end, but the winter hibernation period for your roses has not yet begun either. Your roses are in a kind of slowing down, holding pattern. If you are a rose gardener, you can wonder what to do with yourself during the months of November and December.

Deadheading blooms in October – where old, spent flowers are removed – should be done without stimulating the plant to grow new shoots. By clipping the blossoms just below the flower, but well above the leaves, you’ll get rid of decaying petals without getting new growth.