Tag Archives: trees

Clipping Plants: Pleaching, Pollarding And Coppicing

Clipping Plants: Pleaching, Pollarding And Coppicing

Clipping Plants: Pleaching, Pollarding And Coppicing – Pleaching is a method of planting trees in rows and training the side branches to meet in horizontal, parallel lines. Other growth is cut back or interwoven to form a vertical screen. Beech, lime, hornbeam and plane trees are all suitable for pleaching. This technique is  particularly effective in a formal setting and often used to line paths or avenues in larger gardens. 

Roof Garden With Potted Trees

Roof Garden With Potted Trees

Roof Garden With Potted Trees – Blasted by the sun and battered by the wind, roof gardens are prime examples of exposed sites. they are not the best places to grow garden plants, but if you live in a city apartment, a roof garden can make a useful, extra room, bringing greenery closer to the urban home and providing a pleasant and relaxing place to sit, with the sky as a ceiling.

The large size and sturdy structure of the roof terrace, at the top of an apartment block, makes it possible to grow a selection of heavy specimen trees in pots.

Winter Trees: Chamaecyparis, Cupressocyparis And Cupressus

Winter Trees: Chamaecyparis, Cupressocyparis And Cupressus

Winter Trees: Chamaecyparis, Cupressocyparis And Cupressus – Chamaecyparis or false cypress is a useful genus, from East Asia and North America, with a huge number of cultivars. They range from giant forest trees to smaller forms that can be used as specimen trees, for hedging and as dwarf plants for the rock or scree garden.

Lawson cypress (syn. Cupressus lawsoniana), a conical tree, native to North America, is too large for many gardens, but it has given rise to many cultivars of widely diverging habits All are hardy. Among the best dwarfs is ‘Aurea Densa’, which is rounded and one of the outstanding golden-leaved cultivars.

Bonsai Trees: Fertilizing Tips

Bonsai Trees: Fertilizing Tips

Bonsai Trees: Fertilizing Tips – Bonsai trees, like all other living things, should have food for survival. Unlike the roots of ordinary trees that grow for further distances seeking nutrition, the roots of bonsai trees are controlled to grow inside the tray and hence they will be able to obtain merely whatever nutrition is present in the soil inside the tray. Therefore, the soil within the tray must be often re-furnished with the apt amount of nutrients.

The procedure of adding nutrients to the soil in which plants grow is termed ‘fertilizing’ and it’s a major section of bonsai tree care.

Magnolias

Magnolias

Magnolias – Sumptuous and stately, magnolias are among the most handsome of garden trees, as well as being among the hardiest. Magnolia trees are native to East Asia and the Himalayas, eastern North America and Central America. Magnolias grow 40 to 80 feet tall with a spread of 30 to 40 feet. Depending upon the species, magnolias may be evergreen, semi-evergreen or deciduous.

Drawbacks of some of the species are their enormous size, slowness of growth and reluctance to flower until some 20 or more years after planting. Fortunately, most of the modern selections are free from these vices. The deciduous spring-flowerers make excellent features.

Citrus Trees

Citrus Trees

There is an obvious fascination in having an orange or lemon tree at home, but if you want it to bear fruit, then you will have to buy a citrus trees selected for their ability to grow indoors. The problem is that plants raised at home from pips will not fruit until they are too large for an ordinary room. The dwarfs sold as house plants are shrubby trees which have glossy leaves and produce fruit while the plant is still quite young.

Summer is the usual flowering period for citrus trees, but the Calamondin orange (C. mitis) may produce white fragrant flowers and small bitter oranges nearly all year round.