Tag Archives: winter gardening

Vegetables In The Winter Garden

Vegetables In The Winter Garden

Vegetables In The Winter Garden – Winter can be a very productive time to grow and harvest vegetables, even in some of the coldest areas of the country. Most seed catalogs are now offering a full array of fall and winter options. Freezing areas will need to use a cold frame, hoop or greenhouse, but in warmer climate areas, winter harvests can be even more productive than summer!

Consider these grow-in-the-ground winter options: carrots, spinach, leeks, collards, parsnips, hardy salad greens (Mache, Claytonia, and some lettuces), cabbage, turnips, Swiss chard, and of course kale.

Array Of Evergreens

Array Of Evergreens

Array Of Evergreens – A surprisingly wide selection of evergreen plants have interestingly shaped or attractively colored foliage, which makes them useful for year-round container plantings, and winter arrangements in particular.

Extremely harsh winters can be a problem for plants in containers, but a small selection can withstand the icy, winter onslaught. Those with interesting foliage include abelia, cotoneaster, Cornish heath, euonymus, holly, calico bush, privet, box, ivy, lavender, pieris, periwinkle, and many conifers: false cypress, juniper, spruce, pine, yew, and Eastern hemlock, to name just a few possibilities.

Gardens During The Winter Season

Gardens During The Winter Season

Gardens During The Winter Season – In winter, plants will continuously grow throughout the year even when they no longer have leaves. Therefore, with every season there is a specific way to look after your plants without accidentally burning them with the frost.

When the temperature drops to less than 5°C, your plants could easily die from the cold conditions. To avoid this, especially at night when there is no sun, cover your garden in a frost cloth. With this cloth, they are not completely blocked from the air but they are also containing some warmth.

Midwinter Gardening Tasks

Midwinter Gardening Tasks

Midwinter is mainly a time for indoor gardening jobs including ordering seeds and plants for the upcoming spring, writing labels and designing improvements for the year ahead. These are not unimportant gardening tasks, and by attending to them in good time you are more likely to make the right decision and have everything ready for late winter and early spring when gardening begins in earnest.

In small pots sow seeds for summer flowers – spread them thinly and as evenly as possible. Take chrysanthemum cuttings from a clump of roots that has been overwintered in a greenhouse or cold frame. Choose shoots coming directly from the base of the plant. Space the chrysanthemum cuttings evenly around the edge of a pot containing a potting mixture that is suitable for cuttings.

Garden In Late Winter: Preparing For Spring Planting

Garden In Late Winter: Preparing For Spring Planting

In favourable areas late winter can be almost spring-like, especially in a mild period, but don’t be lulled into sowing and planting outdoors too soon. If the weather turns cold, seeds will not germinate, and seedlings and plants may receive such a check to their growth that they do not do as well as those sown or planted later. Concentrate your efforts on indoor sowing, but make the most of frames and cloches, too, for early crops.

One way of getting plants off to an early start (tomatoes and lettuces, for example) is to sow them in small plastic containers, clearly labelled, in a heated greenhouse. This means that when the spring temperatures do pick up, they can be moved outside, under cloches especially at night when the temperatures can suddenly drop.

Gardening Tips – Help Your Winter Garden Survive The Cold

Gardening Tips – Help Your Winter Garden Survive The Cold

You don’t want to be caught out at the last minute when it comes to planning your winter garden. The coldest months of the year are also the most barren when it comes to the natural world, so if you want to avoid your garden looking like a plant and shrub graveyard, it’s time to start thinking about how you’re going to ensure your yard keeps up with the season. It’s a common misconception that gardens during the winter have to look drab and dull compared with their summer counterparts. This is simply not true. By selecting the correct plants to put in your garden during December, January and February, you can add a splash of colour and more to help brighten up those cold wintry days.

So what can you do to help your winter garden survive the cold?