Indoor

A Guide To Houseplants

A Guide To Houseplants

Finding safe houseplants that can allow you to bring in beautiful plants that clean the air inside your home, without the hassle of constantly trying to keep your plants alive. There are a wide selection of plants that are naturally hardy enough to survive without constant care. With the right plants, you can easily improve indoor air quality and create a space that is green, healthy, and vibrant.

Your Home Environment

When choosing safe houseplants, you will definitely want to consider your home environment. Areas with more natural sunlight can often house a wider selection of houseplants than darker areas, for instance. Low maintenance plants are those that need watered less frequently, such as the peace lily. The plant will let you know it is running low on water by displaying slightly wilted leaves, giving you some time to provide water before the plant actually dies.

Primula

Primula

The Primula group contains some of the best of all winter- and spring-flowering pot plants. The plants bear large numbers of flowers, clustered in the centre of the leaf rosette (the stalkless varieties) or on long, erect flower stems (the stalked varieties).


The Primrose and Polyanthus which grow in the garden make pretty pot plants – the blooms are large and colorful and after flowering they can be planted in the garden. It is usually the tender species which are grown indoors. The flowers are smaller and are borne on stalks. The Fairy Primrose is the daintiest, the Chinese Primrose has frilly leaves and flowers, and the Poison Primerose is the one not to touch if you have sensitive skin.

Indoor Plants: Balcony Garden Tips

Indoor Plants: Balcony Garden Tips

Flower gardening is the best part time activity. You can plant the beautiful and colorful gardens in your backyards or even in your balcony. The only thing you need is to follow the proper flower gardening tips and take care of your plants. Flowering shrubs are best for indoor gardening as they do not grow taller and have an attractive appearance. Here you can read about some home gardening basics to help you plant a flower garden on you balcony.

Beautiful flowers in your garden will improve the overall appearance of your home. But what if you don’t have enough space in your backyards for planting a flower garden? Don’t worry, because here we have provided you the solution. You can plant the garden in your balcony. How is it possible? You can plant the same beautiful flower garden full of colorful flowers in large containers and pots. Rest of the gardening techniques will be similar to the ordinary gardening tips.

Garden Plants: Coleus

Garden Plants: Coleus

Coleus is sometimes called the poor man’s Croton because it matches and even surpasses its stately rival in the brightness and colour range of its foliage, and it does this at a fraction of the cost. You can, of course, buy plants in pots but it is easily raised from cuttings or seed. There is another advantage – Coleus is easy to care for, unlike the fussy and demanding Croton.

There are features where Coleus is clearly inferior to the imposing and long-lived Croton. The bushy 1 ft high plants are soft-stemmed and need pinching out regularly to stop the plant becoming leggy and defoliated. In addition the specimens remain attractive for only a short time – they can be overwintered but the best plan is to treat this foliage plant as an annual by sowing seeds or taking cuttings each spring.

House Plants – Hedera (Ivies)

House Plants – Hedera (Ivies)

There are several types of Ivy – German Ivy, Swedish Ivy, Ground Ivy etc. Here we are dealing with the ‘True’ Ivies plants which are all varieties of Hedera. These Ivies thoroughly deserve their good reputation as decorative plants, and have long been a basic feature of Pot Groups. As climbers they can quickly clothe bare surroundings, provided you choose a vigorous Hedera helix variety.The stems bear aerial roots which cling to wallpaper, woodwork etc. The larger leaved, slower growing Canary Island Ivy does not possess these clinging aerial roots, so adequate support is necessary.

Ivies are not only climbers. They are just as useful as trailers in hanging baskets or as ground cover plants between larger plants, and it is here that the smaller bushy varieties come into their own. Examples of suitable types are Eva, Glacier and Needlepoint Ivy.

Umbrella Palm

Umbrella Palm

Umbrella Palm (Cyperus alternifolius), also known as Umbrella Papyrus, is native to Mauritius and Madagascar where it grows as a wild plant. It grows in the form of shrubs and in most cases these are wrongly mistaken for grasses with which they have little in common, apart from appearance. It has several stems growing directly upward from a mass of roots and an umbrella-shaped cluster of leaves at the top of each stem. The leaves of the umbrella plant are narrow and flattened and only 6″ to 10″ long. All the leaves are arranged atop triangular stems. It is simple to grow, but it requires plenty of water and dew (Umbrella plant is happy growing in shallow water but can also handle drier situations, like in your garden perennial bed.).