Outdoor

Insectivorous Plants

Insectivorous Plants

Some plants live in situations where their roots cannot obtain sufficient nutrients, and so they have evolved mechanisms to trao insects and then digest the contests of their bodies. There are three groups of these insectivorous plants – The Fly Traps with spiny-edged leaves which are hinged in the middle, the Sticky-leaved Plants with hairs which secrete insect-catching fluid, and the Pitcher Plants with leaves which are water-filled funnels.

These plants are very difficult to grow indoors – water with rainwater, keep the compost constantly moist and the surrounding air humid, and feed very occasionally with tiny bits of meat or dead flies.

Fall Garden Plants: Bulbs

Fall Garden Plants: Bulbs

There is a small select group of highly desirable bulbs for the end of the year. They provide a beautiful contrast to the more brazen shows of color on the trees and shrubs, and help keep the eye moving around the fall garden. Most require well-drained soil and plenty of sun in order to thrive, though there are some that prefer shady, moist conditions. Do not remove the foliage until it has turned brown, or next year’s display will suffer.


Canna. Commonly known as Indian shot plants, or Indian reed flowers, these are exotic plants for the fall garden. Even if they did not flower, they would be worth growing for their large, smooth leaves. Use them with grasses and brilliant dahlias to bring the season to a close with a flourish. Stictly speaking they are rhizomatous perennials, but they are planted like bulbs. They are excellent in large containers.

Chrysanthemums: Planting & Care

Chrysanthemums: Planting & Care

The name Chrysanthemum comes from two Greek words, ‘chrysos’ meaning ‘gold’ and ‘anthos’ meaning ‘flower’. Literally, it means golden flower. The genus Chrysanthemum is a large one, having both ornamental and also economic value. These flowers vary greatly in form, size, color and can be grown easily in many climates. When you cut the flowers they last a very long time. The flowers come into bloom in the fall and have a very long season after most blooming flowers are over. The origin of the chrysanthemum is actually Asiatic, and the native habitat of the plants if northern China, Mongolia nad Korea and later Japan.

Chrysanthemums are mainly associated to meanings of compassion, friendship, and secret love. The modern times dictate that the mums are more of friendship flowers. Thus, they are ideally given to dear persons without any romantic shades exhibited.

The Most Beautiful Ferns

The Most Beautiful Ferns

Most ferns are not really difficult to grow in the modern home, but they will not tolerate neglect. The compost must never be allowed to dry out, and the surrounding air needs to be kept moist.

There is a bewildering choice of varieties. Nearly two thousand are suitable for growing indoors, but comparatively few are available commercially. The classical picture of a fern is a rosette of much divided, arching leaves but there are also ferns with spear-shaped leaves, holly-like leaflets and button-like leaflets. There is also a wide choice of ways to display your collection. Many of them are ideal for a hanging basket and some, such as Boston Fern and Bird’s Nest Fern, are large enough and bold enough to be displayed as specimen plants on their own.

Scented Summer Gardens

Scented Summer Gardens

Summer gardens need plenty of scent. Roses are always favourites, but there are many more rich, intriguing scents on offer. With the right choice you can have the fragrance of pineapple (Cytisus battandieri), marzipan (Heliotropium), and even chocolate (Cosmos atrosanguineus). Mix scented plants with showy but less fragrant flowers such as crocosmia and agapanthus to create pretty displays.

Sheltered corners. When growing scented plants, you want the parfume to hang in the air. It is no use growing fragrant honeysuckles, lilies and daphnes in open or windy parts of the garden where the scent will get blown away. You need to grow them in sheltered sites in full sun, where the plants will flower well, and where you can sit and enjoy them to the full.

Crocuses

Crocuses

A crocus is a well loved perennial flower that grows that grows to be 3 to 6 inches tall with yellow, purple, lavender and white cup shaped blooms. A member of the iris family, the crocus is a hardy plant that commonly blooms in the spring, with the exception of a few species of crocus that bloom in the fall.

The crocus plant has over 80 species, about 30 of which are raised commercially. The most commonly planted crocus is the Dutch Crocus, also known as the crocus vernus, which also has the largest bloom (blues and whites predominate). Other common species of crocus are crocus chrysanthus, which is one of the first to bloom in late winter or early spring (often yellow), crocus sieberi, which is also fairly short and blooms very early, and the crocus tommasinianus, another early bloomer that comes in various shades of purple.