Plants

Abutilon (Flowering Maple)

Abutilon (Flowering Maple)

Abutilon (Flowering Maple) – The typical Abutilon or flowering maple is a vigorous shrub with large Sycamore-like leaves and pendant blooms which are borne on slender stalks between early summer and fall. It is a plant which needs room to spread – a large window which receives some filtered sunlight during the day is ideal.

The leaves are often variegated with white or yellow patches and a couple of varieties (A. striatum thompsonii and A. hybridum savitzii) are regarded as foliage house plants which bear summer flowers as a bonus. Abutilon is not a difficult plant to grow despite its exotic appearance. It needs neither unduly warm conditions nor moist air and it benefits from being stood outdoors in summer.

Indoor Winter Gardening

Indoor Winter Gardening

Indoor Winter Gardening – People with indoor gardens residing in areas that have chilly wintry months must remember that even though the plants indoors are shielded from the fury of the elements raging outside, a lot of safety measures should be taken and modifications carried out for indoor winter gardening.
In the first place, if you purchase new plants in winter, ensure they are properly enveloped in newspapers or paper covers for that brief walk from the shop to your vehicle, and from there to your residence. Always bear in mind that even a momentary contact with the outside cold air can harm or even destroy some houseplants. Never put the plants in the boot of your vehicle. It is always advisable to place them in front and switch on the heater.

Herbs For Indoor Garden

Herbs For Indoor Garden

Herbs For indoor Garden – When we think of starting a garden, the first location to plant that come to mind is the great out doors, usually in a back yard a small plot of land close to where we live. Surprisingly, gardens can also be cultivated indoors in pots or containers of various sizes. Window boxes or hanging baskets provide an excellent place to grow herbs indoors. Growing herbs in this way is just as comfortable as growing them in an outdoor garden. The same requirements are needed for growing an indoor garden as is for an outdoor garden.


When you get right down to it, all plants need three basic requirements to grow successfully; and they are sunlight, soil and water. Herbs are no different.

 

How Indoor Plants Grow Under Light?

How Indoor Plants Grow Under Light?

How Indoor Plants Grow Under Light? Grow lights offer a variety of benefits to indoor plants. Light-loving houseplants like hibiscus, citrus, African violets, and orchids can grow year-round under lighting. Also, a winter harvest of salad greens and herbs is possible with the proper lighting system. Here are several points to consider with the different grow lights:

Intensity

The intensity of light is determined by several factors, including the distance between the light source and plants and the wattage of the bulb. Plants can vary quite significantly in relation to the amount of light required.

 

Growing Cucumbers In A Greenhouse

Growing Cucumbers In A Greenhouse

Growing Cucumbers In A Greenhouse – People use greenhouses to grow a huge variety of plants and shrubs. European cucumbers grow very well in greenhouses and these variants are much longer than the other types of cucumbers. As a matter of fact they are longer and heavier. The skin tone of the cucumbers is forest green and the texture is softer meaning that many greenhouse owners cover their cucumbers individually to protect them from bruises.

Nowadays the trend of growing cucumbers in greenhouses is parallel to growing tomatoes. The reason for this is that the cucumber is a type of semi-tropical vegetable that needs moisture, temperature, humidity, high light and fertilizer.

Training Fruit Trees

Training Fruit Trees

Training fruit trees – Cordons are single stemmed trees, fruiting spurs grow directly from the main stem – although double or even triple cordons can be created. Apple and pear cordons are generally planted at an angle of 45° and trained to a height of 1.8 m (6 ft). This produces a stem 2.4 m (8 ft) long. All cordons should be pruned in the summer; little winter pruning is necessary.

Pruning is simple. Cut back all laterals (side branches) to three buds beyond the basal cluster (the cluster of leaves nearest the main stem). Tie in the leader but do not prune it until it has reached 1.8 m in height. Mature cordons may need some of the fruiting spurs thinned in the course of time.