Plants

Topiary In The Winter Garden

Topiary In The Winter Garden

Topiary In The Winter Garden – Topiary can be as traditional or as modern, as abstract or representational as you wish. All that counts is that you choose the right plant for cutting, pruning and shaping and that it fits in with the rest of the winter garden.

For traditional evergreen topiary use Buxus (box). It can be used to make all kinds of shapes, from squares to balls and peacocks. The small leaves mean you can create precise shapes with tight angles, and it is quite fast growing, at about 30 cm (12 in) a year. Box responds well to regular clipping.

Natural Healing Herbs

Natural Healing Herbs

Natural healing herbs for anxiety can prevent and eliminate the pain and suffering caused by anxiety and panic attacks without the side effects commonly experienced with anxiety drugs.


Passion flower and lemon balm have been clinically proven as safe and effective herbs for anxiety. When used in combination passion flower and lemon balm are even more effective for anxiety relief. There is a synergy or interaction relationship between these two herbs that enhances effectiveness and the natural healing process. Although natural healing herbs like passion flower and lemon balm are still used more prevalently in the United Kingdom and Europe, they are gaining momentum and increased popularity in the United States.

Positioning Plants For Maximum Effect

Positioning Plants For Maximum Effect

Positioning Plants For Maximum Effect – The standard advice for getting the best visual effect from your plants is to study their future home BEFORE making your purchase. They may be required for general decoration – a bright splash of color or a medley of green foliage to liven up a dull room. Once you have brought them home you should move the pots around the room so as to get the most pleasing effect.

In other cases the choice is more limited – the plants are required to do a specific job, such as covering an empty fireplace or serving as a divider between parts of a room. Here the final position is already fixed, so you should look carefully at the background before making your decision.

Buxus

Buxus

Buxus (Box) is a popular shrub outdoors, but has only recently been accepted as a house plant. It is tolerant of cool conditions and draughts, producing a dense screen od shiny small leaves. There is an essential requirement – good light, especially in winter. Stand the pot outdoors in summer. These shrubs can be clipped and trained at any time of the year. The only danger is overwatering.

The popular Buxus sempervirens (Common Box) is an evergreen shrub growing to 5 m (16ft) by 5 m (16ft) at a slow rate. Common Box can be grown, but the small-leaved Box (Buxus microphylla) is a better choice. Slow growing – prune to keep in shape. Can be trimmed to decorative shapes.

Japanese Iris

Japanese Iris

Japanese Iris – If you are looking for a unique, magical flower that will add a colorful pop of life to your garden, look no further than the lovely Japanese Iris (Iris japonica). The Japanese Iris are large graceful flowers with an unusual twist. The triple-petaled blooms appear to be floating above their delicate stems and are quite whimsical looking.

Japanese irises grow well in warm, Mediterranean climates and don’t need a lot of winter care. Japanese Iris come in a variety of stunning purple shades from lavender to deep dark purple. Japanese Iris Mt Fuji are a rare bright white with delicate veining on their buttery petals.

Fall Displays: Seedheads And Bark

Fall Displays: Seedheads And Bark

Fall Displays: Seedheads And Bark – Many plants have wonderful seedheads, which can be just as attractive as flowers. Clematis tangutica and Clematis ‘Bill Mackenzie’ both produce large fluffy balls of silvery silk that look exquisite when lit by the sun, especially when growing up through a tree.

One of the few plants with brightly colored seedheads is Physalis alkekengi, the Chinese lantern. This perennial has vivid red or orange ‘paper lanterns’, which can be cut and used in dried arrangements. For a wildflower garden, teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) is a must: its shapely, architectural seedheads not only look imposing but provide valuable food for birds. Poppies and thistles also add interesting shapes to the garden.