Gardening basics

Improving The Conditions Of Your Garden

Improving The Conditions Of Your Garden

Improving The Conditions Of Your Garden – Find out how you can stop relying on others for your fruits and vegetables, by building and maintaining your own home organic garden, full of delicious produce.

First of all, know what grows in your region. When you see the wide variety of seed packets offered online, it is easy to get sucked into the idea of growing everything and anything! In reality, though, only some of them may flourish in your regional environment. Study up on your region and what crops can survive.

Organic Gardening Supply

Organic Gardening Supply

Organic Gardening Supply – Some gardeners now use nothing but organic products and tools. Organic gardeners need supplies that may differ a little from the conventional gardener in order to sustain their gardens.


To prepare the garden for planting, a shovel, spade and spading fork are priceless. A hoe is useful to remove the weeds in your new garden bed or to remove rocks. A scuffle hoe has a blade that points forward and cuts the weeds off at the surface. A pry bar can be used to dig up the large rocks or boulders that can be a problem in your garden.

Training Fruit Trees

Training Fruit Trees

Training fruit trees – Cordons are single stemmed trees, fruiting spurs grow directly from the main stem – although double or even triple cordons can be created. Apple and pear cordons are generally planted at an angle of 45° and trained to a height of 1.8 m (6 ft). This produces a stem 2.4 m (8 ft) long. All cordons should be pruned in the summer; little winter pruning is necessary.

Pruning is simple. Cut back all laterals (side branches) to three buds beyond the basal cluster (the cluster of leaves nearest the main stem). Tie in the leader but do not prune it until it has reached 1.8 m in height. Mature cordons may need some of the fruiting spurs thinned in the course of time.

Potting Table Ideas

Potting Table Ideas

Potting Table Ideas – If you have been shopping for a potting table, you have recognized that they aren’t all alike. Some follow a basic design, while others incorporate extra features for additional storage and better organization. If your gardening supplies have become a mess, maybe these features can help you.

Nearly every potting table offers some shelves in addition to the work space. Generally, the bottom shelf will be wide and sturdy. This shelf is the best place to store heavier and larger items – things like bags of mulch and potting soil, planters and buckets, watering cans. Some potting tables have more than one wide shelf. If you are concerned that some tall items might not fit in a multi-shelf unit, measure the items you plan to store.

Winter Hanging Baskets

Winter Hanging Baskets

Winter Hanging Baskets – The plants that will more readily survive the lower temperatures that winter brings. Of course, the first plants that come to mind are evergreens. Little conifers and box look quite nice as an architectural addition to winter hanging baskets and will last all year round. But just because we’re moving into winter that doesn’t mean we have to compromise on the color in our baskets, although of course our choices will be a little more limited.

There are plenty of plants that will go right through the winter and keep our houses looking beautiful, many of them flowering. Here’s a few ideas for flowering winter plants to keep your hanging baskets looking as lovely as they do in the summer.

Give Your Plants The Humidity They Need

Give Your Plants The Humidity They Need

Give Your Plants The Humidity They Need – Cold air requires only a small amount of water vapor before it becomes saturated, and so on an average winter day the air is moist. When you turn on a radiator to warm up this cold air, its capacity to hold water vapor is greatly increased. As the room becomes comfortable the amount of water vapor in the air is no longer enough to keep it moist. The air becomes ‘dry’; in technical terms the relative humidity has fallen.

Central heating in the depths of winter can produce air with the relative humidity of the Sahara desert.