Tips & Guides

Create A Wildlife In Your Backyard

Create A Wildlife In Your Backyard

Create A Wildlife In Your Backyard – Birds and small animals need water for drinking and keeping themselves cool during hot summer months. If you have enough space in your backyard, try creating a small backyard pond that could provide them the water they need. Another alternative is to install a small bird bath where birds could gather around.

Bird baths – A bird bath could be as simple as putting a small pie tin somewhere and filling it with water. If you want something fancier, you could buy a pre-fabricated one or create one using cement and fiberglass.

Summer Insects And Garden Pests

Summer Insects And Garden Pests

Summer insects and garden pests enjoy being outdoors in the summertime as much as we enjoy. Although most are harmless or even beneficial, there are a few that can be troublesome.

Summer Outdoor Pests


The most common summer pests in many areas are mosquitoes and the ‘social’ wasps, which include paper wasps, hornets, and yellow jackets. Mosquitoes are annoying at best put pose a number of health risks as well. Even if you live in a dry valley, standing water anywhere in your neighborhood can breed mosquitoes, which can carry the deadly West Nile virus.

Planting In June

Planting In June

Planting In June – There are plenty of flowers, plants and shrubs that are best planted in June. Summer blossoms and greenery offer gardeners a generous grace period to ensure that your yard is looking lovely for those summer barbecues or during the prime home selling season.

Keep in mind that gardening is a year-round endeavor and, just like dating or job hunting, timing really is everything. Many gardening dates are pretty arbitrary – such as those avid gardeners who swear sweet peas have to be sown before Valentine’s Day or others who think Memorial Day Weekend is the cutoff for summer planting. June isn’t too late to consider these gorgeous additions to your yard or garden, all of which are perfectly suited for the summer heat.

Plant Feeding

Plant Feeding

All plants, indoors and out, need a plant feeding – an adequate supply of nitrogen, phosphates and potash together with small amounts of trace elements. Only then will they be capable of producing healthy growth with full-sized flowers and leaves.

When plant feeding in the garden, it is usual to apply fertilizers to top up the soil’s natural resources, but even in their absence the plant can continue to draw on the soil’s supply of nutrients by sending out new roots. Indoors the position is quite different.

Gardening Gloves

Gardening Gloves

Gardening gloves provide essential protection in the garden for all sorts of tasks in all sorts of weather. One of the best things about gardening is felling warm, moist dirt in your bare hands, but you will often end up with blistered, chapped, and scraped skin. The solution to this problem is gardening gloves. The more time you spend getting down and dirty in the garden, the more you need gardening gloves. Gardening gloves will be able to ease some of the pain you would otherwise be subject to, letting you spend even more time playing in the dirt.

There are hundreds of different types of gloves on the market, and the kind of gardening glove you buy depends on the way you garden. Some gloves offer protection against specific substances or things, for example, leather gloves are not the best for working with chemicals or water. .

First Aid For House Plants

First Aid For House Plants

When is required the first aid for house plants? House plant varieties have changed over the years, but one would expect their problems to be quite unchanging. This is surprisingly is not so – the menace of coal gas fumes has disappeared in recent years but it has been replaces by an equally serious but completely different menace – the hot, desert-dry air of the centrally-heated room. Even pests and diseases change – Pelargonium rust was virtually unknown until a few years ago.

The problems that can occur are many and varied. Inspect the plants regularly, especially under the leaves. You may detect the first signs of rot because you forgot to reduce watering as winter approached.