Japanese Gardening: The Magic of Japanese Gardens

Being in contact with nature is a good way to achieve spiritual peace. Such surroundings can be established in the confines of your home and garden. Tha Japanese garden is essentially a nature crib in miniature. Japanese gardening is much different from the Western style garden. Most would say that a Japanese garden is far more soul soothing and inspires meditation. Japanese gardening is a cultural form of gardening that is meant to produce a scene that mimics nature as much as possible. Using trees, shrubs, rocks, sand, artificial hills, ponds, and flowing water the garden becomes an art form. The Zen and Shinto traditions are both a large part of Japanese gardening and, because of this; the gardens have a contemplative and reflective state of mind.

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Create An English Country Garden

What could be more delightful than an English country garden in the summer months, full to the brim with flower favourites, and buzzing with insect life, and many more inhabitants in the garden such as birds, frogs, hedgehogs.

English garden has three basic premises, the first is a few vivid-coloured perennials, the second is more flowing paths and beds, the third is more creative using water features and arbours that gives a garden a sense of mystery.


English garden flowers are hardy and can grow just about anywhere, and lavender an absolutely favourite in English gardens is a hardy perennial that thrives in well-drained rocky or gravelled soil and does not need too much fertilizer.

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Gardening In June

By the month of June, all northern hemisphere gardens are in full throttle. Garden chores are almost equalized across zones. Warmer climates are still ahead of the game, shifting into a transition period northern gardeners don’t experience. But crops are still growing, insects are still feasting and, despite the heat and humidity, this is not the time to rest. When the sun does find time to peer out, take the time to appreciate the fruits of your labour as most of the sowing, pricking out and potting on will have been done. Ornamental borders will soon be at their best and you should have heaps of early vegetables to harvest.

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And You Can Grow Your Own Superfood!

If all the grow your own thing is getting a bit overwhelming, or you don’t have time or the resources to grow all the crops your family needs to survive, opt for the best options and just grow your own superfoods!There are so many fruits and vegetables we can grow that are packed full of the good stuff:

Broccoli – has long since been recognised as a superfood and it’s one of those veggies you can eat on it’s own, although it’s always nice with a cheese sauce. There are dwarf varieties available that you can grow in containers or pots on the balcony or patio. Don’t try and grow huge heads of broccoli the first time you try it. Let the first head grow to a medium size then cut and eat. The plant should produce more small heads of broccoli and will keep you in florets for longer!

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Garden Project: A Rock Garden Plants

A rock garden is simply a plot with a mix of rocks and any of several special species of small flowers. Forging a beautiful and relaxing rock garden in your yard is surprisingly simple. In the planting of rock gardens, we must aim to secure by means of careful selection and grouping, an impression of breadth and boldness in the color masses. Nothing is more satisfactory when contemplating any form of garden art, than the feeling that the designer has from the beginning worked with the idea of achieving some definite purpose. This is especially so in the case of rock gardens. Beautiful garden pictures are only possible when each small plant is made to play its part in the building up of a definite scheme.

There are hundreds of plants suitable for rock gardens, but only the most desirable should be included. Rarity should not influence selection. The commonest and easiest grown flowers are often the most beautiful.

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Your Garden In Late Spring

Even late spring can be deceptive. It often seems as though summer has arrived, yet in cold areas there can still be severe late frosts. Take local climate into account before planting any frost-tender plants outdoors. Even with experience it can be a gamble as an untypical season might produce surprises. Judging when frosts are no longer likely is mainly a matter of assessing risk.

It is a good idea to watch when summer bedding is put out in the local parks. These gardeners will have amassed generations of local knowledge of your area, which is by far the best guide.

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