Beauty Of English Tudor Gardens

The Tudors followed Italian influence in creating gardens which mirrored the alignment of the house, creating a harmony of line and proportion that had been missing in the Medieval period. For the first time since the Romans left, sundials and statues were once more popular garden ornaments. But the most prominent contribution of the Tudors to gardening was the knot garden. Knots were intricate patterns of lawn hedges, usually of box, intended to be viewed from the mount, or raised walks. The spaces between the hedges were often filled with flowers, shrubs, or herbs. No Tudor gardens have survived intact, but some of the best examples still remaining can be glimpsed at Haddon Hall (Derbyshire), Montacute House (Somerset), and Hampton Court Palace (near London).

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Why The Perennial Plant Survive Through The Winter?

Perennial plants persist for many growing seasons. Generally the top portion of the plant dies back each winter and regrows the following spring. One reason why the perennial plant is sought after is because of its remarkable ability to survive year round through most weather conditions. Not unlike your local mail delivery person, perennials lives on through rain, sleet, or snow – perfect for the year round gardener. What is it about perennials that enables it’s winter survival abilities, whereas other plants will shrivel up and die as soon as the going get tough? Why can’t scientists engineer annuals or biennials to last as long the perennial plant?


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