World Is More Beautiful With Plants In Window Boxes

If you ever visited Europe, flower-minded or not, you returned with enthusiasm for the window boxes they have seen-the red geraniums in Germany and Austria, the tuberous begonias of Switzerland… So think how beautiful cities might be if private houses, railroad terminals, apartment houses, department stores, and office buildings could all be decorated with window boxes.

Europeans have had rich experience in growing plants in boxes. We see them high above the streets of London, Dublin, Copenhagen, Paris, Rome, Vienna, Heidelberg, and Geneva. Along narrow, winding streets, they are a charming decoration throughout the growing season. In spring, daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, pansies, wall flowers, and English daisies appear in profusion; in summer, geraniums everywhere radiate their dependable brilliance.

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Techniques Of Tree Trimming

Arborists are the people who take care and manage trees in gardens all over the world. How you climb a tree is dependent upon many factors such as how many branches does a tree have or what is the height of the tree you intend to climb. Weather conditions also have an impact. The two most famous techniques used for climbing a tree include free climbing and single rope climbing. Free climbing is basically climbing a tree without a rope, ladder or any other supporting equipment. All a person has is his or her limbs. It is quite dangerous and can lead to accidents and injuries if you are not a professional in free climbing. Even if you are somehow skilled in free climbing, it is advised not to go for it if the tree is extremely tall or the bark is difficult to keep a grip on.


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Beauty Of English Tudor Gardens

The Tudors followed Italian influence in creating gardens which mirrored the alignment of the house, creating a harmony of line and proportion that had been missing in the Medieval period. For the first time since the Romans left, sundials and statues were once more popular garden ornaments. But the most prominent contribution of the Tudors to gardening was the knot garden. Knots were intricate patterns of lawn hedges, usually of box, intended to be viewed from the mount, or raised walks. The spaces between the hedges were often filled with flowers, shrubs, or herbs. No Tudor gardens have survived intact, but some of the best examples still remaining can be glimpsed at Haddon Hall (Derbyshire), Montacute House (Somerset), and Hampton Court Palace (near London).

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