Tag: garden

Exacum

Exacum

Exacum (or Persian Violet) is a small and neat plant which is only a few inches high when offered for sale. Its flowers, pale purple with a yellow center, are also small, but this plant still has several points in its favor. The blooms are abundant and fragrant, and the flowering season extends from mid-summer to late fall.

Keep reasonably cool and in good light. To ensure the maximum flowering period, pick a plant which is mainly in bud and not in full flower. The colors of flowers may be blue, purple, white. Raise Exacum affine from seed or buy as a pot plant. An easy-to-care-for plant but it does dislike draughts. Remove dead flowers regularly to prolong display.

Hebe – Beautiful Summer Shrub

Hebe – Beautiful Summer Shrub

Hebes are mostly native to New Zealand though frequently grown in the British Isles, parts of western Europe and the west coast of North America. This shrub can be seen in flower in some supermarkets and garden centers in July or August – a plant for the conservatory although it can be kept in a large room for a few years. The problem is that it flowers from summer to early fall and this is the time it should spend outdoors.


The floral spikes are made up of tiny flowers which fade to white with age. Hebes are easily recognized by their bottle-brush flower spikes usually produced in large numbers. Hebes leaves are noted for their beautiful appearance throughout the year and usually come in numerous colors including silver, green, grey and red, which serve as a great attraction to butterflies, bees and other insects.

Onions, Garlics And Leeks

Onions, Garlics And Leeks

Onions and their relatives belong to a group of vegetables that have evolved a rather specialized growth habit results in the formation of bulbs at the end of their growing season. A bulb is a swollen storage organ that allows a plant to survive climatic extremes in its natural environment. The great advantage to us is that the bulbs keep exceptionally well in the kitchen enabling us to have onions all year round.

Onions and many of their relatives (such as garlic) are thought to have originated in central Asia or the Middle East and as such are one of the oldest vegetables in cultivation. Their cultivation can be traced back to Egyptian civilization, as early as 3200 B.C. From there they have spread around the world and, not surprisingly, local varieties have been selected for different climates, making it important to choose a variety that is well adapted for the area they are to be grown in.

How To Propagate Succulent Plants

How To Propagate Succulent Plants

Succulents are perfect plants for xeriscape gardens and are easy to root and grow. Once you learn how easy it is to propagate succulent plants, it’s a great way to expand your plant collection. You can use this planting technique with succulent plants from the Crassula family. This propagation technique also works on other cactus and succulent plants like Aloe Vera, Echeveria, Aeonium and Baby Jade (Portulacaria afra).

Planting succulent by cuttings: Start with a cutting about 4 – 6 inches long. Bury about half the stalk in soil. This will give you deep roots and helps the plant withstand drought better. Trim off the last few leaves to make a bare stalk if you need to. The leaves can be planted too; bury about half the leaf, cut side down. Most succulent plants and shrubs will form roots on the joints in their stalks.

Growing Strawberries

Growing Strawberries

Strawberries are excellent fruit for the patio gardener and are especially attractive grown in special strawberry planters or tubs, producing their white flowers in late spring and delicious red fruits that ripen in summer. They can also be raised in growbags, planted in late summer to bear fruit the following year. It is possible to retain strawberry plants in growbags for two years but it is probably best if they are replaced annually.

Strawberries have white occasionally pink flowers, with pronounced yellow centers, held in clusters. They have a green, slightly hairy leaves, toothed edges with 3 leaflets per leaf. The leaves often turn brilliant red in the fall.

Sweet William Plant

Sweet William Plant

Sweet William (Dianthus barbatus) consists of over 300 species of flowers including the carnation (the common name refers to Prince William, Duke of Cumberland (d. 1765), who put down the Jacobite risings). Originating in southern Europe and Asia, with some varieties found as far north as Russia, Sweet William is a biennial that comes in a variety of pink colors.

Sweet William is a biennial plant with a two-year life cycle, producing only leaves in the first year. Sweet William plants, which look very similar to carnations, can be grown from seeds, cuttings or plant divisions. If planting seeds, plan on starting them indoors six to eight weeks before the last frost for spring blooms. The young seedlings generally transplant well and can be set outdoors after the last frost. Seeds sown in the first year bloom in the spring of the second year.