Tag: indoor

Hoya

Hoya

The wax plant (Hoya carnosa) is an easy-to-grow flowering climber. Its vigorous twining stems can reach 15 ft or more, and they must be trained on wires, trellis work or on a moss stick. New stems are bare – the leaves which later appear are fleshy and green, or green-and-cream on the variegated wax plant. Hoya yields fragrant flowers that will keep your home smelling fresh without the aid of scented soy candles.

The fragrant flower-heads appear between late spring and early fall. The miniature wax plant (Hoya bella) needs more heat and humidity but less light – it is best planted in a hanging basket.

Fertilize Your House Plants

Fertilize Your House Plants

Growing houseplants is a great way to start gardening while enhancing the beauty of your home. House plants need fertilizer just like all other plants specially since the nutrients in potting soil eventually get depleted and these plants are not getting nutrients from outdoor soil and rain. Do not wait until your plant is already looking “sick”. Fertilizing needs to be matched with the specific plant, its age and how it is growing. Make sure you save all the information you received when you bought the plant. This should provide you a good outline of all its maintenance needs.


There are different types of house plant fertilizer:

1. Instant powders that are mixed with water.
2. Premixed liquids that are added when you water your plants.
3. Slow-release pellets or spikes that are applied every few months.

Collect All Benefits From Indoor Plants

Collect All Benefits From Indoor Plants

Indoor gardening has many benefits. Indoor plants can brighten a room, provide moisture to the dry indoor winter air, and also supply oxygen during the day. You don’t have to have green thumb to grow indoor plants; there are some low maintenance plants available. Indoor gardening can be an extension of your outdoor gardening, filling in the gardening void experienced in the winter time.

Indoor plant pots. There are many different plant pots to choose from. Choose pots that reflect your decorating style. If you can’t find the perfect pot you can always make your own or improvise. As long as the object you choose can hold water and soil and has drainage holes, it will work.

Chlorophytum

Chlorophytum

Chlorophytum is one of the most popular of all house plants. This popularity is not surpraising – it is quick growing with attractive arching leaves, and in spring ans summer the cascading wiry stems produce small white flowers followed by tiny plantlets. Left on the mother plant, these plantlets grow to give an attractive display, especially in a hanging basket. Removed from the mother plant they can be used to produce new plants.

Above all the Spider Plant has the prime requirement for popularity – it is extremely adaptable. It will grow in hot or cool rooms, in sun or shade and doesn’t mind dry air.

Euphorbia

Euphorbia

Listed here are the non-succulent flowering Euphorbias with the exception of Poinsettia (E. pulcherrima). The Crown of Thorns (often referred to as a ‘Christ plant’ or the ‘Christ-thorn’) is an old favorite which remains an excellent and undemanding choice for a sunny window. It does not need misting, will withstand some neglect and does not have to be moved to an unheated room in winter.

Leaves may drop during this resting season but new leaf buds wil appear within a month or two. Scarlet Plume (E. flugens) is much less common and its growth habit is quite different. Long arching branches bear Willow-like leaves, and in winter the flower-heads appear – colored bracts surround tiny true flowers. The color is orange or white with a yellow eye. Keep cool and rather dry for a month after flowering.

Erica

Erica

The Ericas are small shrubby plants which are bought in flower during the winter months. Their tiny leaves and masses of bell-shaped flowers are attractive, but these plants will give disappointing results in a centrally heated room. In hot, dry air the leaves drop very rapidly, so only choose an Erica for display in winter if you can provide a cool and well-lit spot. Pay careful attention to watering – never use hard water and make sure that the compost is never allowed to dry out.

There are two popular varieties to choose from – E. gracilis bears tiny globular pink or pale purple flowers and E. hyemalis which bears larger tubular pink flowers with white tips.