Tag: indoors

The Best Indoor Trees

The Best Indoor Trees

The Best Indoor Trees – Trees are great things to have in your yard. They clean the air, they give shade and privacy, they are great for climbing and they are beautiful to look at as well. While many trees are just too big to think about growing inside, there are many trees that make wonderful accents to the inside of your home. Here’s just a few: 


If you like more of a desert type tree then the Yucca is for you. They have thick woody stems and pointy leaves that come in a variety of blue to blue green colors and have yellow, cream or white tones to them too.

The Croton

The Croton

The Croton (Codiaeum) is a popular house plant and its attraction is obvious – vivid foliage colors and varied leaf shapes. Stiff leaves are borne on an upright plant –  the usual pattern is large and lobed foliage on which there are distinctly colored veins. A tough-looking plant in the shop or garden center, but  before you buy one of the hybrids of Codiaeum variegatum pictum you must make sure that you can satisfy its fussy requirements. It will need a fairly constant temperature which will not drop below 60°F and it will need high air humidity.


Myrtle Plant

Myrtle Plant

Myrtle (Myrtus) has been grown as a decorative plant for thousands of years and yet it is still a rarity indoors. The small oval leaves are shiny and aromatic – the white flowers appear in large numbers in summer. In the fall the purple berries appear. In midwinter, many of the shoots are crowned by a series of radiating pink stems that are themselves topped with small heather-pink stars. These are immature fruits that eventually berry into purple-black, but in their unformed state they brighten the foliage and give this ancient, egg-shaped evergreen extra sparkle.

Bromeliads

Bromeliads

The native home of the Bromeliads is the American jungle, where they dwell among the Orchids in the trees or on the forest floor. Some Bromeliads are grown for the beauty of their foliage and there are others which are admired for the beauty of their flowers. a few, such as popular Aechmea fasciata and Vriesea splendens, belong in both camps. These dual-purpose plants are cultivated for both their attractive foliage and bold flower-heads.


The usual pattern is a rosette of leathery, strap-like foliage and a flower-head which arises on a stalk from the cup-like centre of this rosette. It may take several years to reach the flowering stage, but the display may last for several months. Once the flower-head fades the rosette of leaves starts to die and is replaced by the offsets at the base.