Tag: outdoor

Lysimachia

Lysimachia

Lysimachia (Loosestrife) is a useful plant for a damp site in partial shade. The genus Lysimachia includes about 150 species of herbaceous and evergreen perennials and shrubs, mainly growing in damp grassland and woodland or near water in subtropical regions.

Saponaria Plant

Saponaria Plant

Saponaria Plant – The common names of Saponaria (Soapwort, Bouncing Bet) are a guide to some of its  properties. Stir a handful of cut leaves in a bowl of water and the lather produced reveals why it is called Soapwort. Leave a clump  to grow undisturbed in the border for a few years and the sight of  its stems springing up amongst other plants reveals why it is also called Bouncing Bet.

Lewisia: Beautiful Rockery Plant

Lewisia: Beautiful Rockery Plant

Lewisia: Beautiful Rockery Plant – Lewisia (Bitteroot, Cantelow’s; Shortsepal) in bloom is sure to please; yellows and reds predominate and so the flowers may be pink, peach or orange as well as white. The petals are frequently striped – a colorful display in your rock garden for early summer.


Unfortunately, this American hardy perennial plant is not easy to keep alive in the rockery. The fleshy leaves form a rosette and rotting of the crown takes place if water is allowed to stand in the heart of this rosette during winter.

Red Hot Poker Plant

Red Hot Poker Plant

Red Hot Poker Plant – Over the years Red Hot Poker plant (also known as Torch lily) has changed its latin name from Tritoma to Kniphofia, and the hybridists have also extended its color range. A word of caution – you can buy a Red Hot Poker and it may be all-red, yellow or even white, so choose with care if you want the traditional red-tipped variety. Whatever the flower color, all produce clumps of grass-like foliage and spikes bearing long tubular flowers.

Veronica Plant

Veronica Plant

Veronica Plant – Veronica Speedwell perennial flowers are a perfect, easy to grow and easy to care for flower. While there are over 500 different species of Veronicas that come in a variety of types and sizes, the Veronica Speedwell is an attractive perennial with long tubular spikes. Veronica’s beautiful flowers come in a variety of colors including pinks, blues, purples and whites. They also add that extra something special to your garden design. If drainage is satisfactory then you will have no trouble with Veronica – no trouble to grow them, but you may well have difficulty in keeping them under control.

Venidium Plant

Venidium Plant

Venidium plant (Monarch of the Veldt, Cape Daisy) is in the aster family and it certainly deserves to be better known. The sunflower-like blooms are 4 in across and they are quite distinctive – at the base of each inner petal is a purple-black blotch, providing a rayed effect around the rim of the prominent black disc. The blooms on their long stems make excellent cut flowers. Mix Cape Daisy flowers into the border or plant around the vegetable garden, as they are very attractive to beneficial insects and pollinators.