Tag: outdoor

Growing Freesia In The Garden

Growing Freesia In The Garden

Freesia is a type of about 14 different species and all the Freesia species are of African origin. 12 of the 14 species are native to Cape Province in South Africa and the other two are native to tropical Africa. Freesias are very fragrant and usually come in white or yellow.

Growing freesias is relatively easy because these plants are hardy and can survive in a variety of different climates. They do best, however, when they are kept in well-drained soil and not allowed to get too hot. Freesias should be planted in full sun during a season that will give the plants plenty of time to establish their roots and to flower before the heat of summer sets in.

Planting A Spring Bulbs

Planting A Spring Bulbs

A true bulb is formed from fleshy leaves or leaf bases, and often consists of concentric rings of scales attached to a basal plate. True bulbs include the daffodrils, reticulata irises and tulips. If provided with enough nutrients, they will often flower for many years.


There are bulbs for all seasons of the year but their glory is in spring when they epitomise the regrowth of a world that has seemed dead all winter. Among the first are the snowdrops (Galanthus) with snowy-white flowers and trim clumps of leaves.

Stephanotis – Symbol Of Marital Happiness

Stephanotis – Symbol Of Marital Happiness

Stephanotis (also known as Madagascar jasmine) is usually associated with bridal bouquets, but it can also be grown as a free-flowering house plant. The word “stephanotis” comes originally from two Greek words, ‘stephanos’, meaning ‘crown’. In the language of flowers, stephanotis signifies ‘marital bliss’.

Stephanotis grows as a tropical evergreen vine that bears white flowers. It can be grown inside if certain conditions are met. It is a beautiful but difficult plant – it hates sudden changes in temperature, needs constant cool conditions in winter and is attractive to scale and mealy bug. For best flowering, it should be kept free of drafts in a location that remains at about 70 °F during the day and about 55 °F at night.

Wisteria

Wisteria

Wisteria is best known for its pea-like blossoms in varying shades of white, rose and lavender. Once established, wisteria is not difficult to maintain. It will survive with average rainfall, and bloom with little to no fertilizer. However, wisteria does need seasonal pruning to ensure spring blooms and compact growing. Otherwise, you could end up with 25 feet of rambling vines and no flowers.

Wisteria is native to the United States, as well as, eastern Asia. The Chinese and Japanese cultivars are most commonly used in landscaping since their blooms are fragrant, unlike the US varieties. Regardless of the variety you choose, follow these guidelines for years of prolific blooms.

Aloe Vera – The Plant Of Immortality

Aloe Vera – The Plant Of Immortality

The botanical name of Aloe vera is Aloe barbadensis miller. It belongs to Asphodelaceae (Liliaceae) family, and is a shrubby or arborescent, perennial, xerophytic, succulent, pea- green color plant. It grows mainly in the dry regions of Africa, Asia, Europe and America.

The name Aloe vera derives from the Arabic word “Alloeh” meaning “shining bitter substance,” while “vera” in Latin means “true.” 2000 years ago, the Greek scientists regarded Aloe vera as the universal panacea. The Egyptians called Aloe “the plant of immortality.” There are hundreds of species of Aloe plant. It has been used for a wide variety of medicinal purposes throughout history. Modern pharmaceutical companies use extracts of Aloe Vera in many skin-based cosmetics, sited as a natural approach to cosmetics.

Insectivorous Plants

Insectivorous Plants

Some plants live in situations where their roots cannot obtain sufficient nutrients, and so they have evolved mechanisms to trao insects and then digest the contests of their bodies. There are three groups of these insectivorous plants – The Fly Traps with spiny-edged leaves which are hinged in the middle, the Sticky-leaved Plants with hairs which secrete insect-catching fluid, and the Pitcher Plants with leaves which are water-filled funnels.

These plants are very difficult to grow indoors – water with rainwater, keep the compost constantly moist and the surrounding air humid, and feed very occasionally with tiny bits of meat or dead flies.