Aloe Vera – The Plant Of Immortality

The botanical name of Aloe vera is Aloe barbadensis miller. It belongs to Asphodelaceae (Liliaceae) family, and is a shrubby or arborescent, perennial, xerophytic, succulent, pea- green color plant. It grows mainly in the dry regions of Africa, Asia, Europe and America.

The name Aloe vera derives from the Arabic word “Alloeh” meaning “shining bitter substance,” while “vera” in Latin means “true.” 2000 years ago, the Greek scientists regarded Aloe vera as the universal panacea. The Egyptians called Aloe “the plant of immortality.” There are hundreds of species of Aloe plant. It has been used for a wide variety of medicinal purposes throughout history. Modern pharmaceutical companies use extracts of Aloe Vera in many skin-based cosmetics, sited as a natural approach to cosmetics.

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Insectivorous Plants

Some plants live in situations where their roots cannot obtain sufficient nutrients, and so they have evolved mechanisms to trao insects and then digest the contests of their bodies. There are three groups of these insectivorous plants – The Fly Traps with spiny-edged leaves which are hinged in the middle, the Sticky-leaved Plants with hairs which secrete insect-catching fluid, and the Pitcher Plants with leaves which are water-filled funnels.


These plants are very difficult to grow indoors – water with rainwater, keep the compost constantly moist and the surrounding air humid, and feed very occasionally with tiny bits of meat or dead flies.

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Fall Garden Plants: Bulbs

There is a small select group of highly desirable bulbs for the end of the year. They provide a beautiful contrast to the more brazen shows of color on the trees and shrubs, and help keep the eye moving around the fall garden. Most require well-drained soil and plenty of sun in order to thrive, though there are some that prefer shady, moist conditions. Do not remove the foliage until it has turned brown, or next year’s display will suffer.

Canna. Commonly known as Indian shot plants, or Indian reed flowers, these are exotic plants for the fall garden. Even if they did not flower, they would be worth growing for their large, smooth leaves. Use them with grasses and brilliant dahlias to bring the season to a close with a flourish. Stictly speaking they are rhizomatous perennials, but they are planted like bulbs. They are excellent in large containers.

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Camellias

Camellia is a genus originating mainly from China but with a range covering a large area of South East Asia. The exact number of species is not clear but it is somewhere around 100. Camellia is an important commercial genus because of one species, Camellia sinensis, the plant from which tea is made. Most gardeners recognize two main groups of camellias, the fall flowering and the spring flowering. However, it is not quite that simple.

Camellias are evergreen and small trees up to 20 meters tall. Their leaves are alternately arranged, simple, thick, serrated, and usually glossy. There are four main camellia groups: Japonica, Reticulata, Sasanqua and Hybrid, with a number of smaller groups based around less common species, such as Camellia hiemalis, and inter-specific hybrids, such as Camellia × williamsii (Camellia japonica × Camellia saluensis).

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Chrysanthemums: Planting & Care

The name Chrysanthemum comes from two Greek words, ‘chrysos’ meaning ‘gold’ and ‘anthos’ meaning ‘flower’. Literally, it means golden flower. The genus Chrysanthemum is a large one, having both ornamental and also economic value. These flowers vary greatly in form, size, color and can be grown easily in many climates. When you cut the flowers they last a very long time. The flowers come into bloom in the fall and have a very long season after most blooming flowers are over. The origin of the chrysanthemum is actually Asiatic, and the native habitat of the plants if northern China, Mongolia nad Korea and later Japan.

Chrysanthemums are mainly associated to meanings of compassion, friendship, and secret love. The modern times dictate that the mums are more of friendship flowers. Thus, they are ideally given to dear persons without any romantic shades exhibited.

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The Most Beautiful Ferns

Most ferns are not really difficult to grow in the modern home, but they will not tolerate neglect. The compost must never be allowed to dry out, and the surrounding air needs to be kept moist.

There is a bewildering choice of varieties. Nearly two thousand are suitable for growing indoors, but comparatively few are available commercially. The classical picture of a fern is a rosette of much divided, arching leaves but there are also ferns with spear-shaped leaves, holly-like leaflets and button-like leaflets. There is also a wide choice of ways to display your collection. Many of them are ideal for a hanging basket and some, such as Boston Fern and Bird’s Nest Fern, are large enough and bold enough to be displayed as specimen plants on their own.

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