Tag: outdoor

Puschkinia

Puschkinia

Puschkinia -It is strange that this close relative of the Bluebell is so rarely grown. Puschkinia is an excellent plant for the rockery – a trouble-free, low-growing plant which bears its attractive blooms early in the year. It spreads quite rapidly by means of offsets which can be used to increase your stock.

The species grown as a garden plant is Puschkinia scilloides (Striped Squill). Flowering in early spring, each stem carries about six flowers which are open starry bells – each petal is pale blue with a central dark blue stripe. Colorful and easy, yet hardly known by gardeners.

Black-Eyed Susan

Black-Eyed Susan

Black-eyed Susan belongs in every sunny garden. Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) is one of the most common of all wildflowers. It has from 10 to 20 orange-yellow neutral rays around a conical, dark purplish-brown disk of florets containing both stamens and pistil. A Swedish naturalist, Linnaeus, named the species Rudbeckia after Olav Rudbeck and his son, who were both professors, and hirta in Latin is “rough hairy”.


The Black-eyed Susan has also been called many other names, such as Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Daisy, Brown Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy, Poorland Daisy, Brown Betty, Blackiehead, Golden Jerusalem and Brown-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia triloba). They grow in open sunny places, dry fields, along roadsides and just about any type of soil.

Create A Barrel Of Petunias

Create A Barrel Of Petunias

Create A Barrel Of Petunias – Most petunias are half-hardy perennials but they are best grown as annuals, as the plants tend to become leggy and less floriferous in their second year. In their first year, they flower continuously from early summer until fall, but as with most plants that flower for a very long season, it is important to deadhead spent blooms to keep the display going.

Their leaves and stems are covered with downy hairs and the leaves are also quite sticky, so grow them away from heavy pollution or they will gradually become smothered in black dust.

Elegant Companions Of Spring Plants

Elegant Companions Of Spring Plants

Elegant Companions Of Spring Plants – Only a handful of spring bulbs grow to a good size. They include Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum), which flowers in late spring and early summer and likes a shaded or semi-shaded site, and the crown imperials. Grown in three colors – yellow, orange, or deep red – the crown imperials are at their best in mid to late spring in a semi-shady or sunny spot.

While the crown imperials are very imposing, the Solomon’s seal is cool, quiet, and elegant. Both bear their flowers well above ground level, so they look best if they are underplanted with a mound of low-growing plants in complementary colors that flower at the same time.

Find A Place For Your Topiary

Find A Place For Your Topiary

Find A Place For Your Topiary – During the fall season the key architectural ingredients start to grab the eye. And some of the best are topiarized shapes that range from traditional birds, urns and simple geometric shapes, to clouds, animals, chairs, and even cars.

The best way to decide where to place your topiary is to walk round the garden on a late fall afternoon when it is looking quite bare, and decide where it really needs livening up.

Jasmine Tobacco

Jasmine Tobacco

Jasmine Tobacco (Nicotiana alata) is a lovely heirloom flower gaining recognition among today’s gardeners. This ornamental tobacco plant is notable for the unusual color of its evening-scented flowers, which make it popular with flower arrangers. It makes an erect bushy plant, 60-75cm/24-30in tall, covered in sticky hairs and with lax group of long-tubed flowers which open out into a star at the end, about 7,5cm/3in long. These are freely borne all summer from early to mid-summer, and are unaffected by most weather.

Nicotiana ‘Lime Green’ is a half-hardy perennial which will overwinter, if the weather is mild and flower early. But it is usually grown as an annual.