Erica

The Ericas are small shrubby plants which are bought in flower during the winter months. Their tiny leaves and masses of bell-shaped flowers are attractive, but these plants will give disappointing results in a centrally heated room. In hot, dry air the leaves drop very rapidly, so only choose an Erica for display in winter if you can provide a cool and well-lit spot. Pay careful attention to watering – never use hard water and make sure that the compost is never allowed to dry out.

There are two popular varieties to choose from – E. gracilis bears tiny globular pink or pale purple flowers and E. hyemalis which bears larger tubular pink flowers with white tips.

Continue Reading

Grow Basil Indoors During The Winter

Many persons hold out for the weather to become warmer prior to planting their vegetable garden. Nonetheless, there are a number of dedicated individuals who will be starting their herb gardens indoors this year. One consideration that must be made, when choosing what herbs to plant, is to be aware of which herbs grow effectively indoors. One good choice is basil.


Only a few herbs can be cultivated with success inside. This is generally either on account that there is not an adequate amount of light or the indoor temperature is not suitable for that specific plant. Basil is a great choice since it is fairly flexible when it comes to sunshine. It may not perform as well inside as outdoors but it is possible to grow.

Continue Reading

Calliandra

Calliandra is a popular plant in the U.S. but rarely grown in Great Britain. The leaves are made up of a large number of segments and the flowers are made up entirely of stamens. It blooms in winter and the ‘powder-puffs’ last for 6-8 weeks.

Calliandra inaequilatera has bright red flowers and dark green foliage. A better choice is the hardier Calliandra tweedii – the flowers are smaller and the leaves are feathery. Calliandra surinamensis has perfumed pink powder-puff and tiny, fine leaves. It’s hardy, compact rounded bush. Calliandra haematocephala has vivid pink, big powder-puff flowers from October to May. Native to Bolivia, this plant becomes a small tree with many-segmented, eight-inch leaves. Calliandra californica gets 6 ft. x 6 ft. in an open, vase-shaped shrub and red puffball flowers. Its dark green leaves are like tight miniature ferns, overshadowed by red spikey flowers.

Continue Reading

Stephanotis – Symbol Of Marital Happiness

Stephanotis (also known as Madagascar jasmine) is usually associated with bridal bouquets, but it can also be grown as a free-flowering house plant. The word “stephanotis” comes originally from two Greek words, ‘stephanos’, meaning ‘crown’. In the language of flowers, stephanotis signifies ‘marital bliss’.

Stephanotis grows as a tropical evergreen vine that bears white flowers. It can be grown inside if certain conditions are met. It is a beautiful but difficult plant – it hates sudden changes in temperature, needs constant cool conditions in winter and is attractive to scale and mealy bug. For best flowering, it should be kept free of drafts in a location that remains at about 70 °F during the day and about 55 °F at night.

Continue Reading

Conifers For Every Size Garden

Once the summer flowers are over, conifers come into their own, both as a contrast to the colors of deciduous trees and shrubs, and later as welcome green features through the winter. There is a conifer for every size garden; they vary from neat, mounded dwarf forms, slow-growing, slim-line vertical trees which eventually reach 3m (10ft) high, to others with beautiful grey-blue foliage to monsters which grow 30m (100ft) high.

They can be used to provide a wide range of effects including windbreaks on the garden boundary, ornamentals for their shape and colored foliage, and architectural features adding extra interest from fall to spring. They can be very effective in formal Italian or Eastern-style gardens.

Continue Reading

Wisteria

Wisteria is best known for its pea-like blossoms in varying shades of white, rose and lavender. Once established, wisteria is not difficult to maintain. It will survive with average rainfall, and bloom with little to no fertilizer. However, wisteria does need seasonal pruning to ensure spring blooms and compact growing. Otherwise, you could end up with 25 feet of rambling vines and no flowers.

Wisteria is native to the United States, as well as, eastern Asia. The Chinese and Japanese cultivars are most commonly used in landscaping since their blooms are fragrant, unlike the US varieties. Regardless of the variety you choose, follow these guidelines for years of prolific blooms.

Continue Reading