Watering Plants Guide

Watering Plants Guide – A garden or flower bed can begin with beautiful plants, but their continuing growth and beauty will depend on whether they are receiving the proper amount of water. This is especially important since over 90% of a plant consists of water. Your plants’ water requirements are dependant on the type of plant, the plant environment, the type of soil and the amount of time and energy that you have to spend in watering.

The results of a proper watering schedule can produce a healthy plant with a good root system, the ability to resist disease and the capability to grow, flower and multiply.

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Plants Can Die During A Warm Summer

To state the obvious, plants cannot live without water – a protracted dry spell in the summer months can result in serious losses the plants most at risk. Newly planted shrubs and trees, bedding plants, shallow-rooted vegetables and climbers growing close to a house. Even deep rooted well established plants like Roses can suffer, trials have shown that growth is impaired and the flowering season is curtailed if these plants are not watered during a dry summer.


As with all garden plants, the battle against water shortage begins well prior to the dry days of summer. Incorporate adequate organic matter into the soil before planting or sowing, and ensure that the soil is completely moist to a depth of about 9 inches when planting or sowing. Mulch in late spring – you will have now done all of the preparatory work that you possibly can.

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Indoor Plants: Plant Watering

Without water a house plant must die. This may take place in a single day in the case of a seeding in sandy soil, or it may take months if the plant has fleshy leaves. But in the end the result is always the same. Because of this obvious fact many gardener beginners give daily dribbles of water, they fail to reduce the frequency of plant watering once winter arrives and they immediately assume that the plant is thirsty whenever leaves wilt or turn yellow. This produces a soggy mass in which practically no house plant can survive. Waterlogging kills by preventing vital air getting to the roots and by encouraging root-rotting diseases. More plants die through overwatering than any other single cause – they are killed by kindness.

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