What Is Compost Tea?

Organic gardeners all know compost is fantastic stuff. But now, there’s something even better and that’s compost tea. If you start with a good compost you’ll have a versatile elixir for all your garden needs. It is not only cheap and easy to make, it provides plants with a hearty dose of healthy nutrients immediately, which helps them to grow better and stronger.

Compost tea helps prevent foliage diseases and at the same time increase the nutrients to the plant and shutdown the toxins hurting the plants. It will improve the taste/flavor of your vegetables. So why not give this tea a try either by buying it or brewing it yourself. You won’t believe the results. Compost tea that is correctly brewed has a wealth of microorganisms that will benefit your plants’ growth and health as well as the soil that they live in. Compost tea can be considered yogurt for the soil.

The basic premise here is to steep your compost in water, which concentrates all the nutrients into the ‘tea’. Then, you dilute your concentrate with water and use it to feed the plants. It takes all those highly-concentrated nutrients directly (and quickly) to the roots and can be applied on an as-needed basis.


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The microorganisms living there are both good and bad. What the tea does is make sure the good guys win by introducing helpful bacteria, fungi, protozoa and beneficial nematodes.

4 ways that good bacteria work:
– Help compete for the nutrients
– Dine on the bad varmits
– Help produce antibiotics to use against the varmits
– They shove the bad varmits out.

Harmful bacteria lives best in soil that does not have good air circulation. Good bacteria lives best and will thrive in soil that is well ventilated with oxygen. This is where a good compost tea, made the right way, comes in. When you have well oxygenated compost you automatically get rid of 3/4 of the bad varmits. Also by using harmful insecticides or chemical fertilizers we reduce the number of beneficial microorganisms in the soil.

A primary reason for producing compost tea is to transfer microbial biomass, fine particulate organic matter, and soluble chemical components of compost into an aqueous phase that can be applied to plant surfaces and soils in ways not possible or economically feasible with solid compost.

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